How do i learn about rc?

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thatcraig

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So I'm seeing these videos where people are building kits and putting them together, and it looks so complicated. I've been in the hobby for a year or so and I've had to repair my rig a few different times, and some of the repairs and upgrades we had to modify which I couldn't have done without help. So where do people learn how to work on the rc?
 
Honestly bud, just do it. Every kit will come with instructions, almost all kits have video assembly demonstrations by various youtubers. There's no better way to learn than just do it. You'll make mistakes and have to take stuff back apart and back together, oh well. You'll learn that way. And in my personal opinion and 30 years of experience working on RC and real 1/1 scale cars, trucks, tractor trailers, heavy equipment, etc, just doing it is truly the best way to learn.

Don't worry, we will all gladly help you along the way.
 
And tools! Need lots of tools. Judging from my collection, about a quarter of a million dollars worth (don't tell the wife). But a cheap starter rc tool set will work for most kits you build.
 
honestly, just trying stuff is how i learned. I've built a Traxxas Mid-motor Rustler on a Nitro rusty chassis. It's great to just try stuff out and reap the rewards. A kit could be great. With a kit you learn about the car you're building.
I'm just nervous about putting a kit together wrong and having to take it apart again.
 
Any tool suggestions? I have the metric screwdrivers and a solder gun.
 
Any tool suggestions? I have the metric screwdrivers and a solder gun.
1.5,2,2.5mm hex drivers, 5.5mm and 7mm nut drivers, shock pliers, needlenose pliers, hobby knife. Some shop towels and gloves.
Some other tools will be needed for some kits, but that should do most of it!
 
So I'm seeing these videos where people are building kits and putting them together, and it looks so complicated.
I been in the hobby for 8 years now, but really only 2 of those years are actually diving into the hobby.
I built my first 4WD car, and first high race grade kit last year, I followed the manual and it was pretty easy. I took a few hours here and there on the weekend for a month, and then all built up as a roller.
So where do people learn how to work on the rc?
All kits come with manuals/instructions on how to build it up, and setup sheets, I follow those.
If on a RTR that I am new too, I follow exploded views.
And I follow my race buddies and uncle.
YouTube is also a great help aswell.

When building up my race buggy, I was basically clueless on how it goes together, I just built it up per the manual. A few months later when I had to do repairs, since I actually built it up, I looked back at the manual for reference on how to take it all apart. Now I can quickly rebuild my car as I know how the car goes together.
With the RTRs, its the same thing. It was complex on taking the Mini B apart and repairing it, but now I did atleast 2 rebuilds of that car and know the in's and out's of the car.
Here is my kit manual that I built my car from. https://img2.associatedelectrics.co...C10B74.1D/Team/B74.1D-Kit-Manual-8-6-2020.pdf
Very easy layout, easy to read, and easy to put together. If you are a newbie like I was, it might be complicated, but I prefer to build up kits now, or buy used rollers/sliders as you learn how the car goes together. Unlike a RTR, you just buy it and run it until it breaks.
Any tool suggestions? I have the metric screwdrivers and a solder gun.
Normal hex tools. Depending on your car. Most RC stuff is metric hex, but I seen some standard hexes here and there. Some RCs (vintage) still use stainless steel phillips head screws. So id get all of those in case.
1.5mm hex driver, 2.0mm hex driver, 2.5mm hex driver, 3.0mm hex driver. 5.5mm nut driver, 7.0mm nut driver, 8mm nut driver, a few turnbuckle wrenches here and there. Shock pliers are useful. I have a electric driver so I use MIP bits for that. Pliers (locking vise grips) are useful.
Here are all my tools.
Tool brands are essential. Good quality ones are my preference
MIP, ProTek, Dynamite, and Arrowmaxx.
Straight and curved scissors. Body reamer (if needed to make holes for body mounts) and a few box wrenches.
PXL_20230301_220135178 (3).jpg
 
YouTube Academy. Seriously. It's how I've learned to work on my home appliances, cars....you name it. Saved me a ton of money, so I can throw it all away on RCs. Lol.

Here's what I've learned and what I tell my friends. If you're having an issue with something, so has someone else. Google. There will be a website or video on how to fix it. Back in the day, we just winged it.
 
YouTube Academy. Seriously. It's how I've learned to work on my home appliances, cars....you name it. Saved me a ton of money, so I can throw it all away on RCs. Lol.

Here's what I've learned and what I tell my friends. If you're having an issue with something, so has someone else. Google. There will be a website or video on how to fix it. Back in the day, we just winged it.
and for some reason i still do it like that....
 
As mentioned by everybody, learn as you go.
It doesn't bother me at all to break something because I really enjoy wrenching on them more than driving.
That's how I learned.
The hardest build I've done was my custom Baja 5b. I built it part by part and not a single instruction manual.
Tough but enjoyable.
 
Some people take to wrenching, some don't. You gotta want to, and you gotta put in the effort. For the most part, it's fun and easy.
 
I'm just nervous about putting a kit together wrong and having to take it apart again.
What on earth are they teaching in school these days, why aren't there rc courses? The best way to learn is to build a kit. That gives you an idea of how everything goes together and how it all works. This will also allow you to understand your rc better and be able to trouble shoot problems.

I am one of THOSE guys who doesn't really love wrenching, but I learned just so I could keep everything running. Heck I'm stil learning. I enjoy it sometimes, I think my problem is I don't have enough free time to not feel rushed when I do it.
 
I'm just nervous about putting a kit together wrong and having to take it apart again.
If you can put together a Lego kit you can put together an RC kit. You can typically get the assembly manuals online before you buy the kit so you can check it out.

This is from the Traxxas TRX4 kit.
1706933794177.png

In their manuals everything is to scale and you can lay the part on top of the drawing (on the left) to make sure it's correct.

You also have thousands of overly helpful people her to assist you with spending money... I mean answer questions. Another source is, if you buy it from your local hobby store, they can often answer questions.

The keys are
  • Read the manual.
  • Take your time.
  • Use good tools.
  • Look at YouTube.
  • Ask questions here.
And don't be afraid you will have to take it apart again, because you will. At some point you will need to change a bearing, re-calibrate the Johnson Rods or something. But since you put it together and have the assembly manual you already know what to do.
 
What on earth are they teaching in school these days, why aren't there rc courses?
I been suggesting that class or club to the uppers for the past 8 years
Only thing close.to rc is robotics which I haven't been to in a while now
 
What on earth are they teaching in school these days, why aren't there rc courses? The best way to learn is to build a kit. That gives you an idea of how everything goes together and how it all works. This will also allow you to understand your rc better and be able to trouble shoot problems.

I am one of THOSE guys who doesn't really love wrenching, but I learned just so I could keep everything running. Heck I'm stil learning. I enjoy it sometimes, I think my problem is I don't have enough free time to not feel rushed when I do it.
Yeah, being in a rush probably has alot to do with it. But free time is hard to come by.
 
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