Help me with onroad classes and racing?

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DavidB1126

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New to it, coming from offroad here

Might be getting something new?
TT02. What class would that fall under?

Here are the main classes my local carpet onroad track runs

  • 21.5 TC
  • VTA
  • 25.5 TC
  • Tcs Euro Truck
  • F-1
  • Mod 12th scale
  • 13.5 12th scale
  • Tcs Pro Spec
  • Tcs Gt E
Those classes are based off of which ones were ran today during practice

During club racing, they mainly run these classes (based off of todays weekly club race)
  • 25.5 TC
  • 21.5 TC
  • VTA
Just incase your are wondering what track
180 Raceway Middle River MD

Which class would the TT02 fit under?
Most likely Touring Car? If so, should I race 25.5 or 21.5 class?
I really like the look of VTA, Would I be able to fit a VTA body on the TT02 and run it in the VTA class?
According to ROAR, VTA class has to have a 25.5 motor. All classes are blinky classes so no electronic timing.

What tires are best for these things? Foam? Slick? Any kind of traction compound used? Is it like offroad racing with mini pin type tires?

Since these are pretty high turn motors, should I get a motor like a V10 G4 motor with adjustable timing, or should I get a Justock combo which would be fixed motor timing?

TT02 is shaft driven, most onroad chassis kits that are 4WD/AWD I seen are all belt drive. Would this affect me racing?

Also heard of USGT, anyone know what that class is all about? US meaning United States and GT meaning Gran Touring, does this mean all American touring model bodies?

Track races every Saturday and is only open on Saturdays so looking to go back up and check it out next week. Checked it out like 2 years ago. Video is somewhere roaming around the forum.

Since this is all onroad, and not like offroad like with jumps. I am guessing that consistency and drive like are key.

Other from going to that track and trying racing onroad with a starter kit, I would just be setting up and bashing in the street and parking lots.
 
TT02 would fall under Euro Truck, it's no where close to race grade and is VERY difficult to tune and drive, absolutely horrible option to begin racing with.

While VTA may be tempting, it lacks a rear wing and will be more challenging to drive as well, though if you are really good at setup, it can be manageable, someone with a quality chassis will leave you in the dust.

I would start with 25.5TC

If you want to go cheap, then build a 3Racing Cero Sport which will offer modern geometry and ability to upgrade over time as key parts wear out:
https://3racing.shop/products/kit-cerosport?_pos=1&_sid=73f1ff257&_ss=r

3Racing will give you a fighting chance to be somewhat competitive against XRay and Awesomatix
 
🧐🤔

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The TT02 can be made to FIT VTA, the TC classes, or possibly TCS Pro Spec, but to actually compete or finish a lap is a whole other matter.

Eurotruck generally runs bone-stock TT01E classes, if you haven't bought a kit yet I'd start there if you're going with Tamiya. Plenty of used Eurotrucks out there too.
 
so, the guiding message is: if you're gonna race your TT-02, you're gonna get wasted. But...... Here's to tryin!
Same story with the slash and rustler l. Trying to race a toy grade like car up against high end 600 dollar plus race kits. Pretty fun isn't it?
 
New to it, coming from offroad here

Might be getting something new?
TT02. What class would that fall under?

Here are the main classes my local carpet onroad track runs

  • 21.5 TC
  • VTA
  • 25.5 TC
  • Tcs Euro Truck
  • F-1
  • Mod 12th scale
  • 13.5 12th scale
  • Tcs Pro Spec
  • Tcs Gt E
Those classes are based off of which ones were ran today during practice

During club racing, they mainly run these classes (based off of todays weekly club race)
  • 25.5 TC
  • 21.5 TC
  • VTA
Just incase your are wondering what track
180 Raceway Middle River MD

Which class would the TT02 fit under?
Most likely Touring Car? If so, should I race 25.5 or 21.5 class?
I really like the look of VTA, Would I be able to fit a VTA body on the TT02 and run it in the VTA class?
According to ROAR, VTA class has to have a 25.5 motor. All classes are blinky classes so no electronic timing.

What tires are best for these things? Foam? Slick? Any kind of traction compound used? Is it like offroad racing with mini pin type tires?

Since these are pretty high turn motors, should I get a motor like a V10 G4 motor with adjustable timing, or should I get a Justock combo which would be fixed motor timing?

TT02 is shaft driven, most onroad chassis kits that are 4WD/AWD I seen are all belt drive. Would this affect me racing?

Also heard of USGT, anyone know what that class is all about? US meaning United States and GT meaning Gran Touring, does this mean all American touring model bodies?

Track races every Saturday and is only open on Saturdays so looking to go back up and check it out next week. Checked it out like 2 years ago. Video is somewhere roaming around the forum.

Since this is all onroad, and not like offroad like with jumps. I am guessing that consistency and drive like are key.

Other from going to that track and trying racing onroad with a starter kit, I would just be setting up and bashing in the street and parking lots.


I agree with Bill. 25.5 TC would be the best way to start. If you plan on becoming more competitive in the near future, make sure to get a newer model of one of the top cars out. Otherwise, you will be dumping a ton of money into aftermarket parts to keep up.
 
On-road classes have something for everyone. Which class you should choose depends mostly on your preference. I’d say three other things are important to consider as well, the rule of three Cs I just made up:

Cost. High-end racing kits can be expensive to buy and maintain but there are more budget-friendly classes as well.

Challenge. Picking a super modified class can be too difficult unless you’re very skilled. Driving skills aren’t enough – you need to understand setup as well and dial things in with precision. Some classes are far easier in both regards.

Company. Is the local scene alive and welcoming, or are you going to drive on the track by yourself even when others are present? Any class can be enjoyable or feel like a waste of time depending on the regular attendees.

Stock Tamiya Truck is among the biggest classes in my area. Allowed modifications and upgrades are limited to actually necessary things like a metal motor plate, ball bearings, and a heatsink on the motor. Generally, the trucks must be built with stock parts that come with the kit: brushed motor, friction shocks, and so on. I just visited the track and got to try one out – turns out I need one now!

If you have difficulty deciding, give Tamiya trucks a go if folks run it in your area. If not, maybe you can be the first one and you’ll soon have company. People buy these kits at the drop of a hat and soon get sucked into racing them because it’s so fun.
 
The TT02 is good for driving for your own enjoyment or in a Tamiya spec class.

Forget about it completely if you are racing in an open touring class with the expectation of being anything but the last to finish – if you finish at all. There are pretty good budget touring cars from brands like Carten, 3Racing, and Xpress. Not a whole lot more cost but loads more performance.
 
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