Can I use Loctite on the screws that hold the shocks to the shock tower?

Welcome to RCTalk

Come join other RC enthusiasts! You'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

The_RC_Dude

RCNT Racer
Build Thread Contributor
Messages
120
Reaction score
49
Location
Washington (the PNW one)
RC Driving Style
  1. Bashing
Hi everyone, I'm about to straighten (again, second time, didn't get it good the first time) the front shock tower of my Wltoys 144001 (don't ask what happened, it includes my uncle), and I was wondering if I could use (blue 242) Loctite on the screws that hold all 4 shocks to their respective shock towers. I, like some people, leave the screws/nuts in question slightly loosened so that (so that there's a little bit of rotational play), in a crash, I can hopefully prevent bending my shock shafts (if it's a smaller crash), or just break less stuff (in a bigger crash), hopefully. The thing is, since they are not snugged down, they like to loosen too much over time, which is annoying. Could I just put a little bit of Loctite on the threads where the nut sits? I'm mainly wondering if there will be any unseen/hidden drawbacks to doing this, thanks!
 

WickedFog

Here, hold my beer!
Supporter
Build Thread Contributor
Messages
3,696
Reaction score
3,915
Location
Terre Haute, IN
RC Driving Style
  1. Bashing
  2. Crawling
You should use Loctite any time you have a screw going into metal. Just make sure not to use too much. It also works best if you put the Loctite on the screw and let it set up before installing the screws. This makes it a bit easier to remove the screws later. If you do let it setup, it's best to keep the first thread or two clear of any Loctite to make it easier to start the thread.
 

Chubaka

RCNT Addict
Messages
743
Reaction score
595
Location
Jurassic Park
RC Driving Style
  1. Bashing
  2. Crawling
  3. Scale Builder
If my plastic strips out, I've been known to use locktite in plastic, and I've also used longer screws with nuts also.

The only drawback is if you use too much it will work you mentally and physically if your not experinced in it trying to get it off.

If it was me, id order a few spare parts and try it anyways.
 

WickedFog

Here, hold my beer!
Supporter
Build Thread Contributor
Messages
3,696
Reaction score
3,915
Location
Terre Haute, IN
RC Driving Style
  1. Bashing
  2. Crawling
If my plastic strips out, I've been known to use locktite in plastic, and I've also used longer screws with nuts also.

The only drawback is if you use too much it will work you mentally and physically if your not experinced in it trying to get it off.

If it was me, id order a few spare parts and try it anyways.
Good idear! But the car he has actually has aluminum shock towers, and the screws go into lock nuts.

@The_RC_Dude
I totally forgot to add last night...
The whole leaving the shock screws a bit loose here has me a bit confused. Leaving them loose is not going to do anything but wear out the hole the screw goes through. That is if the screws don't wear and break first. Bad idea in my opinion. And you have locknuts on there for a reason. Tighten them down. No Loctite needed..
 

Dread Pirate Notty

RCNT Member
Messages
25
Reaction score
15
If you’re leaving it loose to allow it to rotate I’d think using loctite would defeat that.

Since putting on better shocks I’ve been pulling the screw out on the arm and they’re getting stripped. Need new arm soon. Idk if it’d been better to just keep putting the shock cap back on the traxxas ultras or of course keep air time under 15ft.
 

HeavyBag

RCNT Talkaholic
Build Thread Contributor
Messages
247
Reaction score
123
RC Driving Style
  1. Bashing
  2. Racing
Screw and nut should be tight. The M3 nut used to secure your shocks to the shock towers is a locking nut. The nylon inside the lock nut grabs the screws threads and prevents loosening. Over time, the nylon wears down from repeated loosening/tightening, and they need replaced. Your shock cap eyelets should have bushings in them that allow the shocks to pivot when the arms are moving.
 

The_RC_Dude

RCNT Racer
Build Thread Contributor
Messages
120
Reaction score
49
Location
Washington (the PNW one)
RC Driving Style
  1. Bashing
You should use Loctite any time you have a screw going into metal. Just make sure not to use too much. It also works best if you put the Loctite on the screw and let it set up before installing the screws. This makes it a bit easier to remove the screws later. If you do let it setup, it's best to keep the first thread or two clear of any Loctite to make it easier to start the thread.
Yup, I'm aware, I just wanted to make sure since there are some parts that you may not want to use Loctite on. Thanks for the tip!
Good idear! But the car he has actually has aluminum shock towers, and the screws go into lock nuts.

@The_RC_Dude
I totally forgot to add last night...
The whole leaving the shock screws a bit loose here has me a bit confused. Leaving them loose is not going to do anything but wear out the hole the screw goes through. That is if the screws don't wear and break first. Bad idea in my opinion. And you have locknuts on there for a reason. Tighten them down. No Loctite needed..
Yup, metal towers and locknuts.

Oh, hmm, good point, never thought about that, on my front towers I have 3 different holes, so you can adjust your shock position and angle, and the holes that the screws are in are the most outer ones (it came like that stock, and no reason to change it), and they are like 1/3 of a mm wider than the other two holes. Amain also recommended leaving them a little loose in one

Edit: I tightened the screws/nuts up yesterday (or on Saturday)
You could always get longer screws. Then double nut it at the tower so it doesn't move/ backoff
Yeah, interesting idea! I think I'll just tighten the screws/nuts down after reading what @WickedFrog said.
Screw and nut should be tight. The M3 nut used to secure your shocks to the shock towers is a locking nut. The nylon inside the lock nut grabs the screws threads and prevents loosening. Over time, the nylon wears down from repeated loosening/tightening, and they need replaced. Your shock cap eyelets should have bushings in them that allow the shocks to pivot when the arms are moving.
Gotcha, they do have the little rotating bushings.
 
Last edited:
Top